Making the Snowman

Here is a neat song called Making the Snow Man from Songs of Childhood, 1923. MAKING THE SNOW MAN We’ve rolled up a beautiful snowball, Great white snow ball; We’ve rolled up a beautiful snowball, To make a snow man. His nose shall be made of a carrot, Yellow carrot; His nose shall be made … Continue reading Making the Snowman

My Snow Man

Both of these are from Songs of Childhood, 1923. The first is a sort of sad song. Reminds me of the classic short animated film The Snowman, 1982. MY SNOW MAN I made a very large snow man Of icicles and of snow. The sun came out; the snow man said, “I surely have to … Continue reading My Snow Man

Gillian’s Christmas – Tree

Here is a story from Chatterbox, 1912. I really, really loved this story! GILLIAN’S CHRISTMAS – TREE. ‘Mother, can’t we have a Christmas-tree?’ asked Gillian Derwent, one December day, standing by the table, where her widowed mother sat painting Christmas cards, in a shabby sitting-room at Seacombe, a small South-coast watering-place, where they were spending … Continue reading Gillian’s Christmas – Tree

Christmas Cards

This is from Our Darlings, the British book we’ve spoken of before. I think this poem is very cute! CHRISTMAS CARDS. Now first they saved the money, And then they went to buy Their Christmas Cards, some funny, But all to please the eye. Then next they found the inkpot And borrowed Mother’s pen. Without … Continue reading Christmas Cards

Lessons of the Snow

This is from a book called Parables for Little People by J. W. G. Ward. It was published in 1921, consisting of 52 ‘sermonettes’ as they are called. I thought this was going to turn into a sort of ‘A Christmas Carol’ sort of story, but it’s not, really. I thought it was nice. (Not … Continue reading Lessons of the Snow

In Winter

Songs of Childhood, 1923. Are you tired of winter references? Not when it is a reference from an antique book! IN WINTER Brown are all the trees, and bare; Leaves, we know, are hidden there, Waiting till the bluebirds sing Their song of the spring. This is from Chatterbox, 1912. Perhaps this would be a … Continue reading In Winter